High-Powered Women + Love + Motherhood Roundup

Articles worth your time (all, not coincidentally, written by women):

ABC News‘ Sarah Parnass and Dana Hughes on the end of Hillary Clinton’s tenure as Secretary of State:

A Washington Post/ABC News poll released Dec. 6 shows 57 percent of participants saying they’d back a run by Clinton to succeed President Obama.

Asked about his wife’s Oval Office ambitions last April, Bill Clinton said he would be happy either way.

“If she comes home and we do this foundation stuff the rest of our lives, I’ll be happy.  If she changes her mind and decides to run, I’ll be happy,” the former president said. “But that’s light-years away.”

Janice D’Arcy for the Washington Post magazine on the challenges of sharing parenting responsibilities:

Marriage historian Stephanie Coontz says American parents have higher expectations of themselves than any previous generation. Modern parents, she says, do not realize how much they are up against as they try to change the child-rearing rules while living up to heightened demands. “People don’t anticipate in advance what a strain this will be.” They end up “turning on each other.”

Better, she says, would be “less indignation at each other and more at our society” — our familial infrastructure, the schedules of schools and offices that remain fixed in a two-parent, single-income world.

Related, and old, but not yet dated, Jan Hoffman’ for the New York Times on the importance of date night:

“The Obamas really are products of the culture,” said Christine B. Whelan, a sociologist at the University of Iowa who studies the American family. The Obamas exemplify what sociologists call the “individualized marriage,” she added, where a thriving relationship is marked by love and mutual attraction, not just duty to family and social roles.

Jill Flynn, Kathryn Heath, and Mary Davis Holt at the Harvard Business Review list the six paradoxes women leaders face, including:

6. The Careful-What-You-Wish-For Paradox. Women have more opportunities to work today, yet they are opting-out in high numbers. It has been nearly a decade since Lisa Belkin’s article “The Opt-Out Revolution” made headlines in 2003, yet recent statistics illustrate that more women than ever aspire to walk away from work to stay home full-time to raise children. This paradox underscores the reality that women today still feel pressure to have it all and can become stressed and discouraged when that dream is revealed to be impossible. All women (and many men) feel the pressure from conflicting priorities, yet when good women leave work it is organizations that suffer the most. 

What did I miss?